Coaching FAQ’s

1) What is executive leadership coaching?

Executive leadership coaching is simply a relationship between an organizational leader and a coach. The coach provides objective, experienced, knowledgeable perspective to assist their clients as they work through issues that often involve a complex mix of tactical, strategic, and relational components.

Coaches offer third-party perspective that is often difficult to get from people that are close to us personally or professionally.

2)  How does coaching work?

Coaching takes many forms. Typically, coaches speak with their clients either in person or on the phone to:

  • Assess the current situation,
  • Define the goal or desired endpoint,
  • Map out a plan of action, and
  • Help client’s stay accountable to accomplishing their goals.

3)  Is executive leadership coaching only for senior executives?

No. Leaders at all levels within an organization can benefit from a properly structured coaching relationship/program.

4)  How much does it cost?

Because of the number of variables involved in developing a coaching plan with a particular client, few coaches have fixed fees. Some coaches have specific coaching programs for which they charge a standard fee. Virtually all coaches who develop customized programs for their clients have a range of fees they work within that considers factors like:

  • Do the conversations take place in-person or on the phone?
  • Does the client come to the coach or does the coach come to the client?
  • Are we working on a very specific and targeted short-term goal or on a broader long-term goal?
  • Are multiple people from the same organization involved with the coach?
  • How frequently do the coach and client speak?
  • How long do the coach and client speak?
  • And others.

5)  How long does the coaching relationship last?

Like the cost, the time and timing depend on the nature of the issues targeted for discussion and resolution as a result of the coaching relationship. Some client’s prefer to arrange a fixed number of meetings before starting the coaching process. Other client’s prefer to move forward without a specified number of meetings and decide what to do as the relationship unfolds. Depending on the client and their situation, either approach can work.